Developing Infrastructure for Sustainable Tourism

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inamdar1
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an example

Post by inamdar1 »

One example is the Shompole example in Southern Kenya.

The NGO brokered a deal on behalf of the community with donor agencies and the private sector. The private sector put in the funds to build and operate the ecolodge (with a 10 year transfer), while international donors / foundations were approached to address infrastructure and conservation investments, as well as community organizational development / capacity.

So the EU and USAID put in funds for roads for the conservation area, paid for patrol vehicles, radios etc, as well as an airstrip. The Ford Foundation put in funding for the OD / Capacity work. The NGO raised the funds for the laywers to represent the community with the investor on a strong footing.

The community also had to put in equity, but it was structured in the form of natural resources - building materials etc.

The private sector investor had to build and operate the lodge - and was responsible for all the business costs, including all the solar; water; etc.

It took over 2 years to negotiate !

Toby

Post by Toby »

Yes, infrastructure is often one of the biggies that can make or break tourism. The biggest problem is that infrastructure is a catch 22- without infrastructure, tourism cannot grow. However, without tourists physically coming to an area and indirectly demanding such services, it is hard to convince governments to invest in something without a visible, short term return(if there are no tourists coming now, why should we improve our roads and airports?). I think they key is to transform the big players into long term thinkers. Now, you want to talk about difficult??? THIS is the topic...

febo
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Green infrastructure thinking and planning

Post by febo »

Green infrastructure thinking and planning appears to be the future not only for ecotourism itself.

Long term sustainability where recreation as well as services, urban and rural landscape harmonize need another way of thinking and

Black Sheep Inn
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Infrastructure

Post by Black Sheep Inn »

Greetings from Andres & Michelle from Black Sheep Inn Ecuador; we are trying to catch up on the forum and responding to a couple of posts:

Reference to Oliver asking

planeta
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Administrative Note

Post by planeta »

ELSEWHERE IN THE PLANETA FORUM -- We have a new topic in the Green Building section: Request for assistance with trail building in northern Laos
http://forum.planeta.com/viewtopic.php?t=559

Green Building - Planeta Forum
http://forum.planeta.com/viewforum.php?f=23

planeta
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Southern Queensland Wildlife Trail

Post by planeta »

As a reference for the Developing Infrastructure and Marketing, consult the Southern Queensland Wildlife Trail topic
http://forum.planeta.com/viewtopic.php?t=409

A co-operative venture between 20 operators in the region, the Southern Queensland Wildlife Trail showcases wildlife tourism experiences easily reached from major cities in the region. Wildlife Tourism Australia produced a map and website.

REFERENCE

Australia, New Zealand and Pacific Islands
http://forum.planeta.com/viewforum.php?f=6

oliver
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Post by oliver »

As the third week of our e-Forum starts, I would like to call upon our participants to share more of your views and experiences on this essential topic ("Developing Infrastructure for Sustainable Tourism") , which as we know "makes or breaks a destination". Maybe our current participants do not have direct experience in this field (or feel that they can do only so much about it), but to me it remains one of the core concerns of any player in ecotourism, specially those who have to create the business environment for ecotourism - local governments, development agencies and donors. To stimulate discussion, I simply did a google on the keywords "ecotourism + infrastructure", and came up with interesting results:

- The KwaZulu-Natal Nature Conservation Board recognizes that "successful ecotourism development is dependent on the provision of infrastructure and essential support services by the State"; and asks "the relevant authorities to bring in infrastructure and essential support services, including roads, telecommunications, international and domestic airports, tourism marketing, and safety and security measures" - www.kznwildlife.com/Pol_Ecotourism.htm.

- An interesting article on using GIS technology in ecotourism planning in India brings up how important it is to have decent maps (with on-the-ground truthing and all tourism-related geographical elements clearly pinned) to adequately plan for sustainable tourism and infrastructure development. Producing those maps was around 35% of my project here in the Philippines. Now we have to make sure they are used...(http://www.gisdevelopment.net/applicati ... c028pf.htm, the article is called "Remote Sensing and GIS based ecotourism planning: A case study for western Midnapore, West Bengal, India").

- Finally, a EU-funded program called META (Marine Ecotourism in the Atlantic Area) raises the interesting point that often the right kind of ecotourism planning actually re-uses existing infrastructure rather than developing new ones - in this case, less-used resorts. www.tourism-research.org/metalessons.html. But the same principle can (and did) apply to schools being "reengineered" to become trail inns in Madagascar, exhausted mining craters becoming attractions in Curitiba, Brazil (a glass theater was built in a rocky depression close to town), and the famous "Faded Eldorado" Madeira-Mamore railway in the Amazon, mostly gone back to jungle, having part of its rail converted to a short excursion to see the jungle.

oliver
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Post by oliver »

Thanks, Rick, for your very relevant examples. Two points your examples brought up:

- When talking about sustainable technology in infrastructure, there

oliver
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Post by oliver »

In our second (and part of the third) week, we began with my note that it

Meganew
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Post by Meganew »

Hello Oliver,

I have one final very interesting post for your section. Here in Honduras I have been tearing through a tremendous amount of information and hearing many presentations, and doing interviews.

The big issue here is a brand new development that will be a very large project in the small Caribbean coastal town of Tela. The government has put a tremendous amount of planning dollars into it, and they are trying to very carefully manage the impacts of it. It is a traditional resort concept, but designed to be with green infrastructure. They are doing a certified green golf course, maintaining mangroves, and green zones, green corridors, etc.

There is quite a bit of controversy about the scale of the project, and I will have to be reading much more. But in the presentation I was given, it was explained to me that Honduras wants to generate maximum tourism revenues with green developments like this that are "contained" and are not spread all over the country. They have designated three priority zones for heavy tourism development. And they are taking a 40 million dollar loan from IDB to undertake this project. As part of my work, I will be investigating all the project documents, and plan to meet with IDB as part of my effort to see how and where cooperation between donors could potentially lie.

I found this very interesting, as though this is not ecotourism, and most ecotourism players here are against Tela, I have to agree with what Jamie said in his posts elsewhere, that the opportunity to do green resort development or work with these players should not be snubbed by any means. We may well be able to work with the Tela development concept to help local operators and hotels to receive day trips and other more pure ecotourism. The accessibility of Tela to some of the most pristine ecosystems in Honduras is a concern, as the protected area system here is very weak. But with the right planning we might be able to really benefit many more communities and protected areas if the volume of tourism is increased by this mega project. At present tourism arrivals in Honduras is only about 600,000 per year including business travel and it is still their number one source of foreign exchange.

So I think, a country as poor as Honduras, needs to consider doing something on this scale as long as it is done right. I will certainly look forward to researching this more.

Thanks alot Oliver to you especially for all the work you have done on this forum and the wonderful comments you have made.

Megan

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