Triple Bottom Line Business Structures and Strategies

Member dialogue
planeta
Site Admin
Posts: 6843
Joined: Wed May 14, 2003 8:03 am
Location: Oaxaca, Mexico
Contact:

Triple Bottom Line Business Structures and Strategies

Post by planeta »

TOPIC: Triple Bottom Line Business Structures and Strategies
1. Evaluation of technical assistance needs
2. Build Operate and Transfer (BOT) agreements
3. Triple Bottom Line benchmarking and monitoring -- costs and approaches
4. Ecotourism certification
5. Philanthropy

MODERATOR: Toby Bloom

SETTINGS: Active participants can reply to this topic

PARTICIPANTS:
http://www.planeta.com/ecotravel/tour/e ... .html#part

REFERENCE

Ecotourism Emerging Industry Forum (Nov 1-18, 2005)
http://www.planeta.com/ecotravel/tour/emerging.html

redbilb

Ecotourism Certification

Post by redbilb »

Does certification mean anything? Absolutely, but only when you target the correct niche market. If you want to look at a resort with an outstanding record, take a look at Casuarina Beach Club and their list of awards and certifications.

http://www.casuarina.com/news/awards.html

I met Loreto Duffy-Myers at the 6th Annual Sustainable Tourism Conference in Havana, Cuba a couple of years ago. Her experience is that it helped the resort immensely. She is the Environmental Manager there.

Their efforts towards certification not only made the resort more ecologically friendly, it initially saved the owners a lot in operating expenses. Now that they are targeting a knowledgeable and discerning clientele, they are able to reduce volume and increase revenues per person stay.

A lot of public education is required by the certification organizations and the tourism industry to help foster this client base. This is especially true in North America where this concept is relatively unknown to the masses.

Rod Bilz
FRi Ecological Services

George Duffy
Traveler
Posts: 20
Joined: Mon May 03, 2004 9:01 am
Location: Black Diamond, AB
Contact:

Triple Bottom Line

Post by George Duffy »

James, Ron I could not agree with you more.

There is a really good body of knowledge on the website below for anyone hoping to create sustainable behaviour in the public. Doug Mackenzie-Mohr PHd is the author.

http://www.cbsm.com/

I think that another model for us to consider is the FSC label on sustainably harvested wood. I think the pressure on (and by) large guys like Home Depot etc can have quite large effects. These can create the critical mass required to change practises as well as educate the public.

And to bring in another institutional name what about Starbucks? Everyone likes to take shots at them, and no doubt there are some real issues, but Starbucks does at least make steps to walk the talk. What can we learn from them?

I would like to think that we may be able to partner with some non-traditional entities (like Starbucks) whose board of directors have clearly stated policies of operating sustainably. Can we leverage with some of these large corporations some how?

Toby

Post by Toby »

Hello all! I

Meganew
Traveler
Posts: 57
Joined: Fri May 14, 2004 11:52 am
Location: Burlington, VT USA
Contact:

Post by Meganew »

Hi Megan here,

For those of us interested in corporate monitoring. There are a number of other approaches I am very interested in trying out.

First of all, I think we have a lot to learn from the Corporate Social Responsibility movement and also from the Global Reporting Initiative. It has the benefits of helping to systematize and monitor corporate perfomance while moving through improvements in management already discussed. And the great thing about it is that it is a global system that is accepted worldwide as a system for corporate monitoring.

I am presently coordinating CSR discussions with colleagues here in Vermont.- We plan to give a panel talk next year at our Vermont Businesses for Social Responsiblity Conference. I also have worked with the World Bank CSR department looking at how tourism can be incorporated into this global system via a study in Cambodia. I studied extensive documents that they had on hand on how tourism stacks up to other industries. We are really the only industry not extensively involved in this global reporting system. Why not? CSR advocates are actually quite confused about why tourism does not join the fold.

Have other folks been investigating this as a way to move forward on doing productive monitoring with their businesses? This might get a little difficult of course for really small businesses, but as businesses grows might we not all consider that Corporate Social Responsibility Reporting is a wonderful way to establish a system for monitoring our businesses?

Megan

jsweeting
Traveler
Posts: 15
Joined: Wed Oct 05, 2005 8:56 am
Location: Washington D.C.
Contact:

BEST

Post by jsweeting »

Toby - FYI, alas BEST closed its doors a couple of years ago now. Some of their work has been continued by The International Ecotourism Society and the International Tourism Partnership.

janwig
Traveler
Posts: 4
Joined: Mon Oct 31, 2005 2:58 pm
Location: Sweden
Contact:

Post by janwig »

I am doing a test, since after having completed all text, and clicking submit it have not gone through. Why I am now writing off

Toby

Post by Toby »

Hello colleagues,
Sorry to be writing so late today, but our internet was playing tricks on us this morning...

Anyhoo, I think the conversation last week on Certification yielded some good points, all which will be included in the weekly summary.

Not to beat a dead (but certified) horse, but I collaborated on a booklet that was just published last week, called " Beyond The Beach: Quick Reference Guide for Competing in the Sustainable Tourism Market." The PDF version and background info will be available to the public at
www.chemonics.com in the next few weeks, and the content will be posted on the Triple Standards Working Group website,
www.caudillweb.com/triplestandards, in the next few months. Paper versions are currently available in English, and the booklet will soon be translated into other languages. The booklet discusses sustainable tourism certification schemes, awards, codes of conduct, traveler guidelines, and resources. It is meant to be a primer for operators that are new to the concept of sustainable tourism.

But enough about certification... There was an audible e-silence on the topic of successful BOT transfers. I ask again: Can anyone cite a successful example that has been through the entire buy-operate-transfer process? What were the biggest challenges? What should we, as technical assistants, know going into the process? I look forward to discussing this and other themes that you all feel are important this week!

cheers,
Toby

Toby

Post by Toby »

sorry, more internet troubles over the last couple of days...

here is a summary of the first week!

Triple bottom line biz strategies summary for week 1


Miker
Traveler
Posts: 32
Joined: Tue Sep 21, 2004 8:11 am
Location: Toronto & Collingwood
Contact:

Post by Miker »

I am concerned that we are dismissing the benefits of certification - just because there is a lack good research to quantify the benefits of ecotourism certification. Why not approach the tourism research community to push for good research so we can develop research-based programs? We lack good research to quantify the benefits of ecotourism period, or to even characterize who is looking for an ecotourism experience

Toby

Post by Toby »

here is a summary from week 2:

This week, the conversation started off focusing on the benefits and challenges of Resort developing in generating jobs and contributing to resource management. Toot Oosteveen shared with us an example cited at a WTO conference, where approximately 90% of labor and goods at a resort in Nicaragua were procured locally. Oliver Hillel said that those interested in further researhc should check out Voyages, an Australian resort chain, or could contact Klaus Lengefeld at GTZ in Germany, Klaus.Lengefeld@gtz.de.

Miker also contributed an excellent example of how to create a conservation-based economy on a large scale. Tides Canada, along with several other NGOs, works to protect The Great Bear Rainforest in British Columbia, home to some of Canada

Miker
Traveler
Posts: 32
Joined: Tue Sep 21, 2004 8:11 am
Location: Toronto & Collingwood
Contact:

Post by Miker »

I am no expert on the NEAP program but here is a bit of insight. The best bet would be to ask Ecotourism Australia for results of more current research.

The NEAP program in Australia was launched back in 1996. The following are the benefits promoted to prospective members.
Nature tourism and ecotourism certification provides benefits to operators, managers, communities and travellers:

Meganew
Traveler
Posts: 57
Joined: Fri May 14, 2004 11:52 am
Location: Burlington, VT USA
Contact:

Post by Meganew »

Hi everyone,

Just quickly I want to be certain folks are aware that extensive research has been done on the question of certification and its validity in the marketplace and as a quality control mechanism. There have been 2 large Ford Foundation grants associated with this as well as a $3 million IDB MIF project. In fact, this area of our field has had a great deal of research funding associated with it. It is my thought that perhaps the information we need on this topic already does exist.

In my posts, I referenced a few of the many references on this topic. But of course it is easy to find more at the websites for TIES and Rainforest Alliance. Research continues in this field with excellent funding resources, and I have sought to track it closely, and use that experience in my own work.

Thanks,
megan

Miker
Traveler
Posts: 32
Joined: Tue Sep 21, 2004 8:11 am
Location: Toronto & Collingwood
Contact:

Post by Miker »

Sorry to harp on certification but I believe it is an important tool. Megan was quoted in previous postings as follows:
The authors conclude that while certification may be a valid method to involve businesses in quality and sustainability oversight of their businesses, there is insufficient evidence to suggest that certification of sustainable tourism will have market benefits and that such benefits should not be used to justify government, NGO or donor support of tourism certification.
I want to be certain folks are aware that extensive research has been done on the question of certification and its validity in the marketplace and as a quality control mechanism.
But of course it is easy to find more at the websites for TIES and Rainforest Alliance.
I downloaded a recent TIES report (April 2005) completed in association with CESD and here are some direct quotes re the benefits of certification:

Meganew
Traveler
Posts: 57
Joined: Fri May 14, 2004 11:52 am
Location: Burlington, VT USA
Contact:

Post by Meganew »

HI All,

I want to concur with Toby that it was excellent getting a chance to meet in person, and it was amazing that she and I and Toot could all meet here together and talk for a couple of hours about what is transpiring in sustainable tourism here in Honduras and elsewhere.

Thanks alot to all who made contributions. We could certainly get into even more depth on all the issues, but in my view this kind of opportunity allows us to share ideas in a way professionals in our field rarely have the opportunity to do.

Perhaps as folks get more used to the idea of on-line forums we will be able to get even further into some of these knotty issues.

Working in a country like Honduras, all I can say is that there are so many important issues to confront, and that our ability to build competitiveness has to take priority in my view in the private sector. The industry here is 95% small or micro with owners who are presently working day and night to stay in business - whatever we recommend must help them deliver a product that works well in the marketplace in a relatively short period of time. I also see that nearly all the communities here have had little exposure to tourism yet, and they need proper systems to decide how and if to enter this field. And as for the protected areas- they need to be able to gain from the tourists who are arriving (most of whom are not paying entry fees) while trying to make sure reasonable infrastructure is in place. These are urgent priorities, and there are many more I have not mentioned, and I want to work to make sure our priorities as a field are in the right order when offering assistance in DEVELOPING countries where there is really a different set of needs and priorities than in countries where tax dollars and government programs are covering a great deal of expense for developing ambitious programs that could not be considered in a place like Honduras.

Best,
Megan

Locked